Wednesday, December 22, 2010

New Toronto and the First World War

New Toronto was officially founded in 1913 when it separated from the Township of Etobicoke and became a Village.  Due to the growth of its population it became the Town of New Toronto in 1920.  It remained a separate municipality until its forced amalgamation with the Borough of Etobicoke in 1967.  It is now part of the City of Toronto. 

The boundaries of the town were, Lake Ontario on the south; a line running north from Lake Ontario up Twenty-third Street to the railway line on the west; easterly along the railway line until it meets a line along Dwight Avenue on the north; and, down Dwight Avenue to Lake Ontario on the east.

All information and photographs on this site, other than those already attributed, are copyrighted and may not be used without my permission.

© Copyright Michael Harrison 2010.  All rights reserved.

New Toronto War Memorial


 New Toronto War Memorial
© Michael Harrison 2010



 Dedication - New Toronto War Memorial
© Michael Harrison 2010




 Inscription - New Toronto War Memorial
© Michael Harrison 2010



The names of those who gave their lives
© Michael Harrison 2010


The New Toronto War Memorial was designed as a fountain and dedicated in 1919 by the New Toronto Soldiers Comfort Association.  It was originally located on the south west corner of the Lake Shore Road and Eighth Street just outside the Brown Building in which the municipal offices were located.  Later it was moved to the local Royal Canadian Legion Branch.   Today it is located at 150 Eighth Street outside the Winston Spencer Churchill Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion.

Monday, December 20, 2010

Corporal John Arding - 139009

According to his attestation papers dated July 20, 1915 at Toronto, John Arding was born on May 4, 1884 at Grove, Wantage, Berkshire, England.  He listed his wife Florence Arding, 4th Street, New Toronto as his next of kin.  He was a fireman and was a member of an active militia for 9 months, and had 8 years with Royal Lancers. He was 21 years and 2 months of age (the articles below indicate that he was 31 years old) and stood 5 feet 1 inches tall.  He had blue eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion.  He had a tattoo on his left arm.  He was a member of the Church of England. 

He enlisted the same day with his brother Victor. 

He was a member of the 75th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment) when he was killed on November 18, 1916 in the Desire Trench at the Somme.  His remains were never found and he is listed on the Vimy Memorial in France. He was a recipient of the Military Medal.  He was listed as the Son of William and Emily Leah Arding, of Reading, England; husband of Florence Arding, of 816 Fourth St., New Toronto.

His brother Victor was also killed in action on the same day. 



 Articles courtesy of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Sergeant Victor Arding - 139008

According to his attestation papers dated July 22, 1915 at Toronto, Victor Alvus Arding was born in Reading, Berkshire, England on October 14, 1890.  He listed Florence Catherine Arding, 4th Street, New Toronto (later crossed out and new address of River Street, Paris, Ontario written in) as his next of kin.  He was a fireman and indicated that he was currently a member of an active militia.  He was 24 years and 9 months of age and stood 5 feet 10 1/2 inches tall.  He had blue eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion.

He enlisted the same day with his brother John. 

He was a member of the 75th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment) when he was killed on November 18, 1916.  According to the CEF burial register he was originally reported as missing but now reported as killed in action.  He was last seen dead in a shell hole in "No Man's Land".  He is buried in the Adanac Military Cemetery, Somme, France.   He was a recipient of the Military Medal. His next of kin is listed as Florence C. Dempster (formerly Arding), of East End, Saskatchewan.   He is also listed on the Paris, Ontario War Memorial.

His brother John was killed on the same day.



articles courtesy of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial 

Reginald Barran - 1024078

According to his attestation papers dated May 4, 1916 at West Toronto, Arthur Reginald Barran of West Street, Brampton, Ontario was born on December 8, 1898 in Yorkshire, England.  There is a note at the top of this papers written at a later date indicating that he was actually born in 1899 and so was one year younger than he stated.  He listed his father Milner Barran, West Street, Brampton, Ontario as his next of kin.  He was a toolmaker and had no previous military experience.  He was 17 years and 5 months of age (he was actually one year younger) and stood 5 feet 4 inches tall.  He had blue eyes, light brown hair and a fair complexion.  He had a small scar on his left elbow.  He was a member of the Church of England.

He was not killed in the war as he is listed in the 1921 Toronto city directory living with his father Milner Barran in Lambton Mills on the west side of Millwood Avenue.

According to emigration records Milner Barran left Liverpool, England on the Bavarian and arrived in Montreal on May 2, 1903.  He was alone.  His wife Katie and son Arthur sailed from Liverpool on the Kensington a few months later arriving in Montreal on September 5, 1903.

There is however an Edward Barran - 412084who was killed in the war.  Therefore Arthur Reginald must have been placed on the memorial by mistake when it was actually referring to Edward.  He listed his brother William Barran (Hezikiah Baron), 62 Symington Avenue, Toronto as his next of kin.  Later William Barron moved to Lambton Mills as the plaque and scroll for Edward were sent there in 1920.  Checking the 1921 Toronto city directory I only see Milner Barran and his son Arthur Reginald listed.  Was Milner also known as William?  The 1911 census for the Milner Barran family indicates that they came from England but Edward Barran was born in Macon  Georgia, USA.  Therefore could it be the same family?  According to the Canadian Virtual War Memorial Edward was the son of Luke and Annie Barran, of Macon, Georgia, USA.  

Sapper Ernest Clarke - 172350

According to his attestation papers dated August 17, 1915 at Toronto, Ernest Clarke (mistakenly spelled "Clark" on the monument) was born January 9, 1880 in Leicester, England.  He listed his wife, Lillian Clarke, Sixth Street, New Toronto as his next of kin.  He was a fireman and indicated that he had served with the Royal Engineers for eight years.  He was 34 years, 11 1/2 months of age and stood 5 feet 8 inches in height.  He had blue eyes, black hair and a dark complexion.  He had a tattoo on his chest of a "heart hanging from a bunch of flowers".  He was a member of the Church of England.

He was a member of the 2nd Battalion of Canadian Engineers when he was killed on July 22, 1918. According to the CEF burial register he was killed accidently when he was one of a small party taping out a trench.  An anti-aircraft dud shell was on the ground in his way.  He picked it up and threw it away and when it hit the ground it exploded killing him.  


He is buried in the Duisans British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France.  He was listed as the son of Albert and Elizabeth Clarke of Leicester, England; husband of Lily Clarke (nee Brant), of 142 Seventh St., New Toronto, Ontario, Canada.  

 articles courtesy of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Frank Clark

William Cooper

Sergeant Frederick Critchley - 769459

According to his attestation papers dated January 1, 1916 at Toronto, Frederick Critchley, New Toronto, Ontario was born on November 25, 1889 in Preston, Lancashire, England.  He listed his mother, Mary Critchley, Preston, Lancashire, England as his next of kin.  He was a carpenter and had no previous military experience.  He was 26 years and 1 month of age and stood 5 feet, 8 1/2 inches tall.  He had brown eyes, black hair and a dark complexion.  He has a scar on his left wrist and a mole on his left abdomen. He was a member of the Church of England.

He was a member of the 10 Battalion, Canadian Engineers when he was killed on September 2, 1918.  According to the CEF burial register after his company had reached their objective in front of Dury and were consolidating, he was wounded twice by enemy shell fire and died while he was being dressed.


He is buried in the Dury Crucifix Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France.

Corporal Joseph Hodges - 778430

According to his attestation papers dated January 17, 1916 at Mimico, Joseph Hodges, New Toronto, Ontario was born on November 7, 1888 in Worcestershire, England.  He listed his wife Jennie Hodges, New Toronto, Ontario has his next of kin.  He was a gardener and had no previous military experience.  He was 27 years and 2 months of age and stood 5 feet 7 1/2 inches tall.  He had blue eyes, dark hair and a fair complexion.  He was a member of the Church of England.

He was a member of the 1st Canadian Railway Troops when he died on January 31, 1919 from influenza at the Military Hospital in Ripon.  He is buried in Harborne, St. Peter Churchyard, Warwickshire, England.  He was listed as the son of Walter and Sarah Ann Hodges, of Harborne, husband of Maria J. Hodges, of 3 Summerville Terrace, Harborne Park Rd., Harborne. 

 courtesy of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial
 

Private Arthur Larkin - 1096179

According to his attestation papers dated February 13, 1917 at Toronto, Arthur Larkin of 7th Street south, New Toronto, Ontario was born on September 11, 1898 in Toronto.  He listed his mother, Emily Larkin, 7th Street, New Toronto, Ontario as his next of kin.  He was unmarried, a labourer and had no previous military experience.  He was 18 years and 6 months of age and stood 5 feet 4 1/2 inches tall.  He had blue eyes and fair hair and complexion.  He had a scar on the first finger of his right hand and a mole on the top of his left foot.  He was a member of the Church of England.

He was a member of "B" Company, 75th Battalion Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment) when he was killed on September 2, 1918.  According to the CEF burial register he was killed during the storming of the Drocourt-Queant Switch Line.  His death occurred during the attack and capture of the ridge, and the sunken road beyond, between the town of Dury and the Arras-Cambrai Road, a few hundred yards north of the Arras-Cambrai Road.


He is listed as the son of William J. and Emily Larkin of 116 Seventh Street, New Toronto, Ontario.  He is buried in the Dury Mill British Cemetery in France.  

According to the 1911 census and his birth registration he was actually born on September 11, 1900 and so was only 16 year of age when he enlisted and 17 years of age when he was killed.

 courtesy of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Sapper Vincent Leaghy - 1102188

Could this actually be Vincent Patrick Leahy?  According to his attestation papers dated January 27, 1917 at Toronto, Vincent Patrick Leahy of 1649 Queen Street West, Toronto was born on November 1, 1895 in Peterboro, Ontario.  He listed his sister, Elizabeth Leahy, R.R. #9, Peterboro, Ontario, as his next of kin.  He was a motorman and had no previous military experience.  He was 21 years and 2 months of age and stood 5 feet 7 inches.  He had blue eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion.  He had an operation scar on his left varicocele.  He was Roman Catholic.  

He was a member of the 7th Battalion, Canadian Railway Troops when he was killed on October 28, 1917.  According to the CEF burial register, about 5:30PM on October 27, 1917, immediately after the men of "B" Company had partaken of their evening meal a number of enemy aeroplanes bombed their camp wounding and injuring a number of men.  Sapper Leaghy was amongst the wounded, he having been struck in the abdomen and left leg by a splinter from one of the bombs and died the following day at No. 47 Causality Clearing Station.

He was listed as the son of Mr. and Mrs. P. D. Leahy.  He is buried in the Dozinghem Military Cemetery in Belgium.  

Private Neil MacFadyen - 799730

His name is mistakenly spelt McFadyen on the memorial.


According to his attestation papers dated January 28, 1916 at Toronto, Neil McFadyen, Mimico, Ontario was born on August 14, 1883 in Glasgow, Scotland.  He listed his mother Margaret McFadyen, High Street, Oban, Argyleshire, Scotland as his next of kin.  He was single and a gardener and florist.  He indicated that he had had 18 months previous military experience as a Lance Corporal with the 48th Highlanders.  He was 32 years and 5 months of age and stood 5 feet 6 1/4 inches tall.  He had brown eyes, black hair and a dark complexion.  He had a mole on the right side of his spine.  He was a Presbyterian.


He was a member of the 75th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment) when he was killed on August 9, 1918.  According to the CEF burial register he took part in the attack and capture of the Town of Le Quesnel.  While storming a trench system at the eastern outskirts of the town he was shot through the head by an enemy sniper and killed instantly.  


He is buried in the Le Quesnel Communal Cemetery Extension, Somme France. 


courtesy of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Private Arthur Millard - 27726

According to his attestation papers dated September 22, 1914 at Valcartier, Quebec, Arthur George Millard was born on November 29, 1893 in Aldershot, England.  He listed Mary Jane Millard, New Toronto, Ontario as his next of kin.  He was a fitter and had no previous military experience.  He was 20 years old and stood 5 feet 7 inches tall.  He had brown eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion.  He had two scars on his left arm and neck and a large circular scar over each shin.  He was a member of the Church of England.  

He was a member of the 15th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment), when he was killed on April 24, 1915.  The CEF burial register records that he was previously reported missing but now reported as being killed in action.  His remains were never found and he is listed on Menin Memorial Gate in Ypres, Belgium.  His brother William also enlisted on the same day and was killed five days later on April 29, 1915.

According to an article from the Toronto Telegram on September 14, 1917 he was the son of W. H. C. Millard, Clerk of the Town of New Toronto.  The War Graves Register lists the family home as 122 Eighth Street, New Toronto.    

 article courtesy of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Interestingly Arthur's birth year is recorded as 1894 in the 1911 Census so he was actually one year younger than he stated on his attestation papers.  His father William H emigrated to Canada from England in 1907 and the rest of the family followed in 1908.  Checking Canadian Passenger Lists I was able to find that William Sr traveled on the "Vancouver" arriving in Halifax, Nova Scotia on April 30, 1907 from Liverpool.  The family traveled on the "Tunisian" arriving in Halifax, Nova Scotia from Liverpool on April 10, 1908. 

Private William Millard - 27725

According to his attestation papers dated September 22, 1914 at Valcartier, Quebec, William Millard was born on March 6, 1893 in Woolwich, England.  He listed Mary Jane Millard, New Toronto, Ontario as his next of kin.  He was a machinist and had no previous military experience.  He was 21 years of age and stood 5 feet 7 inches tall.  He had blue eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion.  He had moles on his left buttock and left lumbar.  He was a member of the Church of England.  


He was a member of the 15th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment) when he was killed on April 29, 1915.  The CEF burial register indicates that he was previously reported missing but now for official purposes presumed to be dead.  His remains were never found and he is listed on the Menin Memorial Gate in Ypres, Belgium. 

His brother Arthur enlisted the same day and was killed five days before him on April 24, 1915.

According to an article from the Toronto Telegram on September 14, 1917 he was the son of W. H. C. Millard, Clerk of the Town of New Toronto.
article courtesy of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial

According to the 1911 Census, William's father William emigrated to Canada from England in 1907 and the rest of the family followed in 1908.  Checking Canadian Passenger Lists I was able to find that William Sr. traveled on the Vancouver arriving in Halifax, Nova Scotia on April 30, 1907 from Liverpool.  The family traveled on the Tunisian arriving in Halifax, Nova Scotia from Liverpool on April 10, 1908. 

Private Joseph (John) Mullineaux - 163635

According to his attestation papers dated August 9, 1915 at Toronto, John Mullineaux was born on October 3, 1879 in Blackburn, Lancashire, England.  He listed Mary Mullineaux, Sixth Street, New Toronto as his next of kin.  He was a machinist assistant and was an active member of a militia.  He was 35 years and 10 months of age and stood 5 feet 7 inches tall.  He had blue eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion.  He had three vaccination marks on his left arm.  He was a member of the Church of England.

He was a member of the 75th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment), when he was killed on March 1, 1917.  The CEF burial register indicates that he was previously reported as missing but now killed in action in an attack south of Givenchy, France.   His remains were never found and he is listed on the Vimy Memorial in France.  

  article courtesy of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial

The records of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission indicate that his wife Mary was living at 103 Anvil Street, Blackburn, Lancashire, England by 1929.

Private John Neal - 33141

I think that this is the following John Neal.  


According to his attestation papers dated September 23, 1914 at Valcartier, Quebec, John Neal was born on July 9, 1886 in West Darby, Lancashire, England.  He listed his father John Neal, Englehart, Ontario as his next of kin.  He was single and worked as a hospital attendant (at the Mimico Asylum in New Toronto?).  He had no previous military experience.  He was 28 years and 2 months of age and stood 5 feet 9 inches in height.  He had brown eyes, dark brown hair and a dark complexion.  He had five vaccination marks on his left arm, and a fleshly mole one inch to the left of his ?  He was a member of the Church of England.


He was a member of the 2nd Field Ambulance, Canadian Medical Corps, when he was killed on April 17, 1916.  According to the CEF burial register he was killed in action at Kruisstraat, Belgium. He is listed as the son of Son of John and Alice Neal, of Englehart, Ontario.   He is buried in the Vlamertinghe Military Cemetery in Belgium.

Private John Neil Sr - 136267

According to his attestation papers dated September 2, 1915 at Toronto, John Neil Sr. was born on March 8, 1875 in Paisley, Scotland.  He listed his wife Sarah Neil, Fifth Street, New Toronto, Ontario as his next of kin.  He was a paper mill worker and had no previous military experience. He was 39 years and 5 months of age and stood 5 feet 5 3/4 inches tall.  He had grey eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion.  He had a scar on the index finger of his left hand and a scar on the first finger of his right hand.  He was a Presbyterian. 


John Neil Sr. was a member the 46th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Saskatchewan Regiment) when he was killed on November 6, 1916.  According to the CEF burial register he was wounded in the right leg by shrapnel on the night of November 4, 1916, and after first aid was administered he was taken to a dressing station.  From there he was evacuated to No. 49 Casualty Clearing Station where he succumbed two days later.  Further details in the Commonwealth War Graves register indicate the gunshot wounds to his leg had resulted in a compound fracture.


He was buried at the Contay British Cemetery, Somme, France.


John Neil Sr. was the son of Mrs. John Neil, of 30 Ferguslie St., Paisley, Scotland; and husband of Mrs. Sarah Neil, of 103 Fifth St., New Toronto, Ontario.


According to the 1911 Census the family emigrated to Canada from Scotland in 1904.  Interesting John Neil Sr listed his birth year at 1874 which would have meant he was 40 years old at the time of his enlistment.  Did he revise his birth year down by one year so that he was under 40 years of age?
 
 courtesy of the Virtual Canadian War Memorial 
(though the captions to the photos seem to be reversed)

Private Richard Saunders - 139176

I think that this might be Richard Pearson Saunders.  According to his first set of attestation papers dated August 2, 1915 at Toronto, was born on December 5, 1884 in Carlisle, Cumberland, England.  He listed his father, Frank Saunders, 50 Kendal Street, Carlisle as his next of kin.  He was a carpenter and was an active member of the 9th Mississauga Horse.  He was 30 years and 7 months of age and stood 5 feet 10 inches high.  He had brown eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion.  He was a member of the Church of England.  The second set of attestation papers do not seem to belong to him as the regimental number, birth place and date are not correct.

He was a member of the 75th Battalion Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment) when he was killed on June 8, 1917.  According to the CEF burial register he was killed in action during an attack west of Avion.


He is listed as the son of Frank and Jane Saunders, of 50 Kendal St., Carlisle, England.  He is buried in the Canadian Cemetery No. 2, Neuville-St. Vaast, Pas de Calais, France.  The cemetery is located in the Vimy Ridge Memorial Park.

  courtesy of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Private Joseph Staples - L/7128

Joseph Staples appears in the 1911 Census living on 6th Street with his mother Lavinia, brother Jessie and sister Leslye.  They were all born in England but their year of emigration to Canada is not recorded.  Joseph is recorded as being born in August 1885.

Since he was listed as serving in a British unit I cannot find any Canadian attestation papers for him.   The Commonwealth War Graves Commission lists him as a citizen of the United Kingdom through he appears on the Canadian Virtual War Memorial.

Joseph Staples was a member of the 1st Battalion, Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment), when he was killed on January 13, 1915.  His remains were never found and he is listed on the Menin Gate Memorial in Ypres, Belgium.